Posts

The importance of a synopsis

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Like most writers, I hate writing synopses.  I find them hard and it's even harder to keep them down to a page of A4 while getting everything that is necessary in.  However, having recently reached the end of my WIP, I discovered the importance of a synopsis for keeping a writer on track.  This is a book I've been writing a while - a lot longer than I would normally take over a book, in fact, due in no small part to the disruption and uncertainty of the Covid-19 lockdowns.  But, finally, it was finished and I was breathing that wonderful and long-awaited sigh of relief at the prospect of sending it off to the editors when I realised the ending was all wrong! Totally wrong!! As I'd worked through the book,the story changed a little, as often happens. I'd moved away from the original synopsis slightly, and I was aware of the fact. But it wasn't until I'd finished the book that I realised the original ending, as per the synopsis, was actually the right one.  So las

Nearing the end . . .

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It's been a while since I blogged here but that doesn't mean I haven't been busy writing! I have, in fact, though it's been rather a longer and slower process than normal, probably due to the lockdown, which has affected us all to greater or lesser degrees over the last year. Can you believe it is over a year since Covid-19 first hit the world? Like most people, I've been working from home over the last twelve months, which should be, of course, most conducive to writing.  Like many, I suspect, there have been days, and even weeks, when it's been the opposite, with lethargy hovering on the horizon more often than not.  Even so, I've been doing something for my writing every day (an invaluable piece of advice I read on some writer's blog many moons ago and wish I could remember whose!) and I am almost at the end of the first draft of my work in progress. I say 'first draft' though really it's a case of writing a few chapters then going back a

Christmas Reading

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Christmas this year is going to be very strange after the events of 2020 and Covid-19. Last December seems a lot longer than just  a year ago and the way of life under the pandemic has almost become normal now.  I never really do very much over Christmas, anyway, apart from take some time off work, have a rest from routine, and catch up on things I don't have time to do at other times of the year. But one of my favourite indulgences over the festive period is reading and this year is no exception.  One of the books on my reading list is The Turning Tides by Jane Fenwick , the second in her trilogy of  seafaring sagas set on the north east coast of England. I got to know Jane and her work when I created a website for her a couple of years ago and since then her books have become a must on my shelves, both for their engrossing story lines that really draw you in and also for her vivid and evocative sense of time and place.  I'm also revisiting some old and well-worn novels. As I

The Dreaded Chapter Five

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I blogged about this a couple of years ago and I don't know whether to feel disheartened or vindicated to be blogging about it again!  Because there is a certain point in every book where a brick wall appears; for me this happens at chapter five, every time. Why?  I think many writers - at least those aiming to send off those first three chapters to publishers or editors - tend to work so hard on the opening section that they experience a bit of a slump in the following chapters, or lose their way temporarily.  Having carved out the characters and set up the conflict that will keep them apart until the end, the task is now to keep them apart yet bring them together at the same time.  The 'getting to know you' stage has to be delicately balanced in order to sustain the underlying conflict between the characters, and add in even more challenges for them to overcome on the road to that Happy Ever After. So it is completely understandable that a writer might run out of steam fa

A trip to the past

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I've changed direction slightly in recent months, or rather, added a new direction to my writing. While I'm still writing my dual time novel, set in 1916 and 2016 (conveniently avoiding the Covid-19 pandemic!), I'm also editing a historical novel I began back in 2013.  There are a lot of eye openers when you go back, either to re-read or re-write something you wrote several years earlier.  If your journey as a writer has gone as you'd hoped and planned it would and the intervening years have been one of growth and experience, then the first thing that jumps out at you when reading earlier efforts are the weak spots in the story, the lack of character depth and often the immaturity of the writing. I saw all three when I looked over my 2013 partial manuscript, which was depressing at first, but reworking it now, I am also heartened by the improvement in my writing and the maturing of my voice over the last seven years.  Having focused on contemporary novels over the last

End of Chapter Three!

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This is my favourite point in the writing process.  You've got the setting down, established and gotten to know the characters, and the conflict that is keeping them apart - and bringing them together - is hopefully paved and ripe for exploration.  And the chapters ahead is when the characters really start on their journey, discovering each other and themselves along the way to the happy ever after. At least that's the theory!  So many times in the past, I've hit the saggy middle around about chapter five.  I'm the sort of writer who can't skip past blocks in the road but have to work through them before moving on, and I've often remained stuck in the middle for  far too long.  I participated in a  series of Facebook seminars in April, run by editorial coach Joanne Grant , and one of these sessions dealt with the saggy middle and offered some really useful tips on how to deal with this if it happens. So I'm hoping, this time, I won't  have to ;) This

A new book

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In these days of Coronavirus, the support and camaraderie of friends and colleagues is invaluable, and I've been blessed with more than my fair share. I'm relatively lucky work-wise, being a freelancer who operates from home most of the time anyway, but my sympathies go out to those in less certain circumstances. Writing is, of course, a very solo occupation but in these unsettled days, when people are dying daily and everyone's life is turned upside down, it has become almost a life-line. I've taken a lot of heart and encouragement from the emails of writing friends and the network of writers on social media sites like the RNA Facebook page. At times like this, social media really does what is is supposed to do - connecting people in a positive and healthy way by sharing stories that keep us optimistic and hopeful that this will be over sooner rather than later and that life - and writing - will be back to normal. One of the positive things for me personally to co